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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Irrigation and plant density effects on head rot and yield of broccoli found in the catalog.

Irrigation and plant density effects on head rot and yield of broccoli

Robin L. Ludy

Irrigation and plant density effects on head rot and yield of broccoli

by Robin L. Ludy

  • 179 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Broccoli.,
  • Broccoli -- Diseases and pests.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Robin L. Ludy.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination70 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages70
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15195743M

    Effect of foliar urea application on quality, growth, mineral uptake and yield of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L., var. italic). Plant, Soil and Environm – Plant, Soil . Distribution of rainfall is more important than total volume. Yield reductions can occur if moisture stress occurs during critical growth stages of a crop. Table 33 of the Appendix lists the periods of the greatest water demands by various vegetables. If irrigation water is limited, plant no greater acreage than can be irrigated optimally.

    In addition, broccoli requires regular water, especially during drought, to prevent the plants from going to seed. Plant broccoli in full sun to ensure optimum head size. Sowing seeds Broccoli can be direct seeded or started indoors for transplants. Spring plantings should be made 2–3 weeks before the last frost date in your area and Fall. Everaarts, A.P., Nitrogen fertilization and head rot in broccoli. Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Scie Everaarts, A.P., de Willigen P., a. The effect of nitrogen and the method of application on yield and quality of broccoli.

      Broccoli plants like it cool but not cold. According to Bonnie Plants, “If transplants sit exposed to cold below 40 degrees for a week or two, the chilling injury triggers heads to form way too early.” If your small broccoli plant is already making a head of broccoli, you're not likely to ever get a large head of broccoli from that plant. Quick Guide to Growing Broccoli. Plant broccoli during the cool weather of early spring and fall. Grow it in containers or an in-ground garden. Space broccoli plants according to the label (usually 18 inches apart). Choose a location with full sun, easy access to water, and fertile soil with a pH between and (amend soil with lime if.


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Irrigation and plant density effects on head rot and yield of broccoli by Robin L. Ludy Download PDF EPUB FB2

The effect of amount of applied water under two irrigation frequencies (once versus three times per week) on the incidence of bacterial soft rot, caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, and yield of broccoli was investigated in field studies conducted in and At head initiation, the amount of applied water was varied by utilizing a line source irrigation system.

Within-row plant spacings from 15 to 30 cm and between-row spacing of 41 and 51 cm were employed to test the effect of spacing and population of two cultivars on head rot and yield of broccoli.

Yields of 'Gem' increased linearly as the plant population increased, but yields of OSU did not respond to the population : Robin L.

Ludy. Irrigation and plant density effects on head rot and yield of broccoli. Abstract. Graduation date: Effects of amount of applied water and frequency of irrigation\ud on head rot and yield of three broccoli cultivars were evaluated in\ud and Two irrigation frequencies were established with a\ud line-source sprinkler system.

Main effects of frequency and timing of irrigation on yield and head rot incidence in broccoli at second harvest, NWREC, Treatment No. heads harvested Yield Mean head No.

rotten per plot kg/plot wt. (g) heads per plot Frequency 2-day interval 8-day interval Significance NS NS NS NS Timing morning IRRIGATION AND PLANT DENSITY EFFECTS ON HEAD ROT AND YIELD OF BROCCOLI INTRODUCTION Head rot, caused by the soft rot erwinia, Erwinia carotovora subsp.

carotovora. is a common disease of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) in the Willamette valley of Oregon. The incidence and severity of head rot varies from field to field and from year to.

The effects of plant density on broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck) commercial characteristics are well determined. larity effects on broccoli head weights and yield. Studies were carried out during at Geisenheim, Germany, to investigate the effects of irrigation on growth and crop yield of broccoli cultivars Cordula and Lord.

Irrigation varied according to growth stage (15 leaves). Total water requirements for broccoli were mm ( mm water/day), of which mm was irrigation water.

In general, broccoli plants can be harvested two or three times or for a period of up to three months. The plant first produces a large center head. This head. Irrigation water applied ranged from 70 to mm, and water consumption ranged from 88 to mm. The ef-fect of irrigation water level on the yield, head height, head diameter, head weight and dry matter were found to be significant.

The highest yield was t ha Crop yield response factor (k y) was found as The highest. Broccoli 20 ‐25 Heading Tomato – Soil that contains plants roots is water reservoir • Field Capacity‐water stored in soil 12‐24 hrs after Rooting density y depth Tomato 40 Irrigation rate and plant density effects on yield and water use efficiency of drip-irrigated corn.

Agricultural Water Management – El-Sharkawi, H. and Salama, F. 1. Introduction. Spear size is the main commercial character in broccoli (Wescott and Callan, ), and plant density is the most important factor affecting yield when yield is expressed on an area basis (Wien and Wurr, ).Competition between broccoli plants greatly affects spear weight (Besson,Chung,Kahn et al.,Wurr et al., ); which can be adjusted to the.

Head rot was well established by the second and third harvests. The percentage of heads affected by rot decreased with greater space between plants. However, the total number of disease-free heads was greater at higher plant density since the larger number of heads harvested more than offset the increased head rot percentage (Table 2).

It reflects in realization of higher total yield. Greater plant density exerts a reducing effect on the productivity manifestations as the values of all studied characters are lower than those read in growing with smaller density.

The genetic factor has the strongest, dominant effect more than 53% on total disperse of all characters. The effect of nitrogen and plant spacing on the marketable yield of Tsoi sum. LSD details as given for Fig. I I I I I I I I I I I I I ~- 1 O0 c- 90 o._/ 80 -~ 7O 60 lOcm x 30cm II "-,d 30 30cm L a b 20 30cm i 0 ~ I I I I I I I I I I I I o ~o ~oo ~5o 3~o 4o0 ~o Rote of N (kg ha.

flower head is from 3 to 8 inches ( to 20 cm) in diameter, and plants average 12 to 24 inches (30 to 60 cm) tall. Desirable broccoli has small uniform beads (flower buds), good blue-green to green color, and tight, dome-shaped heads that stand above the leaves for ease of harvest.

Hollow stems, watery head rot or. January and March, but the broccoli produced low yield because this period had heavy raining during the yield harvesting period. The broccoli was infected with head rot from the impact of rain drops [8], and destruction was caused by the bacterium Erwinia carotovora ssp.

carotovora that causes soft rot disease in broccoli [1]. The total amount of water applied, the frequency of irrigation, and the timing of irrigation all may affect the incidence and severity of soft rot of broccoli heads. For a report on irrigation effects on broccoli head rot, see Effect of Frequency and Timing of Irrigation on Yield and Head Rot of Broccoli ().

Marketable fruit yield per m2 increased linearly with plant density from kgm-2 ( plant/m2) to kgm-2 ( plant/m2). Plants grown in bags and pots produced similar marketable yields.

Growers should consider head size, shape and color, as well as yield, earliness and disease resistance when selecting broccoli cultivars. Resistance is available for downy mildew, black rot, Pseudomonas bacterial head rot, club root, Fusarium yellows and yellowing in stor - age.

Some varieties are better suited for fall produc. Incorporate diseased plant debris into the soil. Eliminate cull piles. Control cruciferous weeds. Minimize the length of leaf wetness periods by reducing plant density, orienting rows with prevailing winds, and irrigating in the morning when leaves can dry quickly.

Avoid overhead irrigation during head .The results indicate that with increasing planting density, plant height, leaf divergence, leaf number per plant, floret diameter and single floret weight decreased whereas the pass rate of commercial florets, the number of qualified commercial florets per unit area and the broccoli yield showed a characteristic binomial curve (“low-high-low”).Yield response: There were interaction effects of treatments and varieties.

Broccoli growing under the shading had higher harvested plant than under the full sunlight as shown in Figure 4A. The Yok Kheo had the highest harvested plant (%), followed by the Top Green and Green Queen ( %).

The interactions between treatments.